Matt Gemmell

My new book CHANGER is out now!

An action-thriller novel — book 1 in the KESTREL series.

★★★★★ — Amazon

Going indie

Development, General, Personal & Work 1 min read

It seems that with every passing week, someone else in the Mac development world “goes indie”, i.e. quits their regular day-job and makes a commitment to building a Mac OS X software business of their own (with or without doing some freelance work part-time to tide them over financially). Gus’ blog keeps me up to date with who’s just gone indie, and the news always has an energising effect on my personal development projects.

As some of you may know, I’ve been working for a company here in Leith (Edinburgh) as a web applications developer for the past 3 months (i.e. since we moved to Edinburgh; I’ve been a web apps developer for quite a while longer than that), and also devoting some hours during the evenings and weekends to work on my own Cocoa projects (really one application in particular). I’m not here to talk about the app just yet, though you’ll hear more about it in the new year. The reason I’m writing is to say that I handed in my notice at work on Thursday (to finish up before Christmas; just a few days now), and as of 2007 I will officially be out there on my own.

I’ll be starting off by spending 60% of my working week freelancing remotely, doing both Cocoa and Cocoa Touch development (obligatory mention of the Instinctive Code site if you’d like to get in touch in that regard). The remaining 40% of each week will be devoted to my own development work, with a view to getting some software out there and eventually making that my full-time occupation. I’ve thought long and hard about this, budgeted as carefully as I can, talked it through fully with Lauren, and I think that now is the right time to do this. I’m 27, I feel I’ve really got something to contribute to the OS X software landscape, and I’m determined to give this my best possible attempt.

It’s scary to lose a guaranteed income and all, but nowhere near as scary as the spectre of future regret, and that’s a hell of a lot more important. Here goes.